Florida Citrus Community Loses Legend

Lifetime Of LeadershipThe Florida citrus industry has lost a friend and a leader in the passing of E. Stanley (Stan) Carter at age 74. A native of Indian River County, Carter was a life-long citrus grower and advocate. Both his grandparents and parents were pioneers in the Indian River citrus industry.

Before his passing, Carter served as citrus grove division manager for McArthur Farms for 23 years. Though he had many interests, he was a citrus grower at his core and a cheerleader for orange juice and grapefruit, which he referred to as “the world’s finest.”

Carter was very active in various state citrus organizations, most notably the Indian River Citrus League where he served on the board from 2004-2012 (president in 2006 and chairman 2007-2009). He served on the Florida Citrus Commission from 2007-2011. He was a member of the Florida Production Managers Association, Florida Citrus Mutual, Florida Farm Bureau, and Jaycees.

His council was valued throughout the state. He severed on the advisory board of the St. Lucie County Extension Service and on the advisory board of the Indian River Citrus Research and Education Center.

His achievements were many, but he will be remembered by many for his role in helping to create Florida’s BMPs program to preserve the state’s waters. Carter was recognized for these efforts with the 2002 Florida Grower Citrus Achievement Award. He represented agriculture as a calming voice during the heated debate over water in the late 1990s.

Carter was instrumental in building the template that would become Florida’s BMP program, which is today administrated by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. He often said: “I am not an environmental activist; I am an active environmentalist.”

“Stan was one of the most thoughtful, industry-first people that I’ve ever met,” says Doug Bournique, executive vice president of the Indian River Citrus League. “He provided industry leadership on the BMPs program that eventually went statewide. A true leader, and he will be missed by all.”

“Stan Carter was unselfishly devoted to the Indian River citrus industry,” says Brian Boman, an ag engineer from UF/IFAS. “He will be missed for years to come.  I spent many hours with him during the development of the Indian River citrus BMPs. Amid all the turmoil and accusations surrounding the issues with the Indian River and Lagoon at the time, he was the voice of reason. He stressed that growers should embrace the BMPs not because they had to, but because it was the right thing to do. He was a wise and humble giant of the industry.”

Other awards and recognitions include: Legend Of The River award; Florida Sustainable Environmental Leadership Award; Florida Agriculture Commissioner’s Ag-Environmental Leadership Award; and St. Lucie County Conservation Award.

Carter is survived by his wife Joyce Carole; son Matthew Carter and granddaughters Samantha and Hope Marie Carter; brother Marvin Carter and wife Ruth; sister Joye Brooks and husband Dennis.

Carter’s funeral service will be held Dec. 28, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Christ Church in Vero Beach.

If you would like to share memories or thoughts on Stan Carter’s life and service to the citrus industry, please share them in the reader comments section below.

Topics: ,

Leave a Reply

6 comments on “Florida Citrus Community Loses Legend

  1. The citrus industry and I lost a friend, mentor and great person. I will miss our times on the golf course and the contageous laugh that Stan brought with him. We’re crying but the angels are laughing.

  2. When I first moved out of grove care operations into fruit procurement my old friend Jack Murphy introduced me to Stan. The stories those two told of old times was both humorous and amazing as to how things “Used to be”. Stan was a legend and will not be forgotten. RIP old buddy and may God Bless your family in this time of need.

  3. Yes, Stan will be missed. The relatively little time we shared together as cooperators in field trials and seeking legislative relief regarding windbreaks was sufficient to learn why he is one of the good guys. Stan always seemed genuinely friendly with a wonderful sense of humor and calmness. I always sensed in Stan his interest in learning and observed his low-key but effective leadership style while a group of us was in Tallahassee. Stan’s passing reminds me of a line from a famous poem: “Do no ask for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for the.” He took seriously his role in guarding our industry ands seemed to enjoy it, if not draw strength from that role. However, at the end of the day, I just liked Stan.
    Bill Castle, professor emeritus, UF/CREC, Lake Alfred

  4. Stan was a giant in many terms, but in his faith, first. Outside of his constant encouragement, two specific times with Stan will stay with me forever. The first, when I was first elected to Chair the Florida Citrus Commission (Stan served with me), I made this comment to Stan “This is going to be a huge task to accomplish, a little daunting quite honestly”, and here is what Stan said to me, “just put one foot in front of the other and keep looking forward, and I’ll be shoulder to shoulder with you all the way”. In that moment I knew of his character and friendship. Second, right after Stan became aware of his cancer, Ralph called me and let me know. I immediately called Stan, prayed with him, and in typical Stan fashion, he drew his strength from Christ, and was so upbeat it was amazing. When I hung up the phone with him, I thought to myself, I called to love on Stan, and he blessed me in an unbelievable way. That was a clear picture of the magnitude of his faith. That was just Stan, and I for one will miss my brother. I’m thankful that God allowed my path to intersect with his. He is celebrating Christmas at the throne of Christ. Joyce Carole, we love you, and if a need ever comes up that we can help with, we are a phone call away! God blessed Stan Carter and all of us through him!!!!

  5. I met Stan in the early 80’s on Merritt Island and became one of his many, many friends when he moved back to Vero Beach and worked for McArthur Farms. He indeed loved our citrus industry and was a valuable voice of wisdom for many years. May he rest in peace.

  6. Stan Carter took the recomendation of our friend Lou Forget, to give me a chance at doing a “round of spray”, that round lasted for about 10 years. After that most of my opportunities in citrus came on Stan’s recomendations. He had such calmness and confidence about him, as a leader in our field ,he accomplished many things without ever raising his voice.—maybe just a sermon or two. We all know he’s still having morning cofee and selling some fruit. He will be missed.

Citrus Stories
Cartoon sketch of a citrus seed machine
Varieties & Rootstocks
February 22, 2017
Citrus Nurseries Analyze the Need for Seed
It seems many growers are more certain about their scion choices than they are about available rootstocks. Read More
citrus psyllid closeup
Insect & Disease Update
February 18, 2017
The War on Citrus Psyllids Still Raging
Despite control challenges, keeping the pest in check remains the best approach to managing HLB. Read More
IMPAC.org screenshot
Citrus
February 17, 2017
How Precision Agriculture Is Helping Farmers Win Over Consumers
New Florida-based organization is seeking to break down barriers between farmers and shoppers by providing a platform to not only show what is grown, but how it's grown. Read More
Brussels Sprout on a fork
Citrus
February 16, 2017
Food Trends Driving Growth Opportunities for Florida Farmers
More niche markets emerging for growers to give consumers what they want and need. Read More
John Merritt
Citrus
February 15, 2017
Florida Citrus Community Loses Longtime Leader to Leukemia
John Merritt, known as an innovative grower and staunch industry advocate, was 60. Read More
Grower Jonathan Brown of Bethel Farms inspects his citrus grove.
Citrus
February 9, 2017
Florida Citrus Forecast Comes Full Circle With Latest Update
Amid up-and-down pattern, USDA puts all-orange production numbers back on target with initial estimate. Read More
Load of pot poorly camouflaged as Key limes
Citrus
February 8, 2017
Nearly Two Tons of Pot Plucked From Load of Key Limes
Shaped to resemble the tangy citrus fruit, law enforcement officials extract 34,764 packages allegedly filled with an ingredient not intended for pies. Read More
The Latest
Citrus
February 25, 2017
Citrus Research Investments Yielding Pos…
Despite still having mounds of wood to chop, grower, federal, and state programs collectively are making a dent. Read More
Citrus
February 22, 2017
New Insecticide Available to Combat Suck…
Minecto Pro from Syngenta has received EPA approval for use in specialty and vegetable crops to control lepidopteran and other pests. Read More
Citrus
February 22, 2017
Skilled Labor Needed to Keep Agriculture…
Even with the challenge of feeding a growing global population at hand, has focus been lost on recruiting where jobs on the farm are need most? Read More
Citrus
February 17, 2017
How Precision Agriculture Is Helping Far…
New Florida-based organization is seeking to break down barriers between farmers and shoppers by providing a platform to not only show what is grown, but how it's grown. Read More
Citrus
February 16, 2017
Food Trends Driving Growth Opportunities…
More niche markets emerging for growers to give consumers what they want and need. Read More
Citrus
February 15, 2017
Florida Citrus Community Loses Longtime …
John Merritt, known as an innovative grower and staunch industry advocate, was 60. Read More
Citrus
February 9, 2017
Florida Citrus Forecast Comes Full Circl…
Amid up-and-down pattern, USDA puts all-orange production numbers back on target with initial estimate. Read More
Citrus
February 8, 2017
Nearly Two Tons of Pot Plucked From Load…
Shaped to resemble the tangy citrus fruit, law enforcement officials extract 34,764 packages allegedly filled with an ingredient not intended for pies. Read More
Citrus
February 5, 2017
New Product Helps Bees Brush Off Mites
A British company developed Bee Gym, distributed by Vita Ltd. Read More
Citrus
February 3, 2017
Wonderful Citrus Stakes a Major Claim in…
Acquisition of the largest citrus marketer in Florida makes California company the crop’s top grower, shipper, and packer in the U.S. Read More
Citrus
February 2, 2017
Florida Seeking to Fete More Eco-Innovat…
Nominations open for the Commissioner’s Agricultural-Environmental Award. Read More
Citrus
February 2, 2017
University of Florida Celebrating a Cent…
Cheers all around for UF/IFAS' CREC, the largest facility in the world devoted to a single commodity. Read More
Citrus
January 30, 2017
List of Best College Farms Released
Website evaluated farms on sustainability factors, community programming, and courses available at the university or college farm, not just in the classroom. Read More
Citrus
January 30, 2017
Game Far From Over for Florida Citrus
Attendees of the 2017 Florida Citrus Show convene to commiserate over current challenges, vet future wins via new varieties. Read More
Citrus
January 25, 2017
Ban Lifted on USDA News Releases
Acting USDA deputy administrator says the practice is typical with new administration changes. Read More
Citrus
January 25, 2017
USDA-ARS to Halt Publishing News Release…
News media confirm report. Read More
Citrus
January 24, 2017
Trump Withdraws U.S. From Trans-Pacific …
Fresh produce export market to hit a wall with signing of executive order. Read More
Citrus
January 20, 2017
Farming Will Always Have a Place in Flor…
Growers are resilient and agriculture will survive in our state and elsewhere. It has to, if we want food on our plates. Read More