EPA Takes Steps to Reduce Risk of Drift-Related Herbicide Injury

EPA Takes Steps to Reduce Risk of Drift-Related Herbicide Injury

Growers who farm on smaller parcels of land near other farmland have a higher potential for herbicide injury from spray drift. Earlier this year, we reported Texas winegrape growers described suspicious incidents of dicamba injuries to vineyards in the Texas High Plains during last year’s growing season.

Advertisement

In 2016, EPA received 117 complaints of dicamba injury in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. In Missouri alone, EPA reports damage from dicamba misuse was reported on more than 42,000 acres of crops including peaches, tomatoes, cantaloupes, watermelon, peas, and other crops.

In light of the complaints, the EPA has reached an agreement with manufacturers of the dicamba herbicide to implement measures to further minimize the potential for spray drift on neighboring crops. Learn more about the new measures at CropLife.com.