New Registrations Of Belay Insecticide

New registrations for Valent U.S.A’s Belay (clothianidin) include use in pecans and other tree nuts, cranberries, peaches, and a number of vegetables, such as brassica, tuberous, corm, cucurbit, fruiting, and leafy vegetable crops. California, New York, and Florida registrations for these crops are pending.

Belay provides control of a broad spectrum of pests, including pepper weevil, aphids, thrips, pecan nut casebearer, pecan weevil, and more. Belay is readily translocated throughout the plant for optimum insect control.

According to Carlos Granadino, Valent product development manager, “Growers can never have enough tools available for this pest during the long harvest season. Belay is also highly active on other key pests of vegetables including aphids, thrips, including melon thrips, stink bugs, cucumber beetles, squash bugs and harlequin bugs.”

John Cranmer, Valent field market development specialist, said Belay also is a good fit for sweet potato growers facing pests such as the exotic white grub.

“Valent has a new label plus a 2(ee) exemption in place for Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia,” Cranmer said. “Belay at 12 fl oz/A, applied preplant incorporated prior to transplanting the sweet potato slips, controls exotic white grub and suppresses wireworm

For more information, go to www.valent.com.

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