EPA Agrees To New Limits On Fertilizer And Animal Waste In Florida

Last week, EPA announced a settlement of a lawsuit filed by the Sierra Club, Florida Wildlife Federation and other environmental groups. In the settlement, EPA will set legal, numeric limits for farm and urban runoff of fertilizers and animal waste. This will be the first time EPA will force numeric limits on nutrient runoff on a state.
 

Advertisement

Environmental groups hailed the EPA settlement and credited the Obama Administration for action on the measure. In a statement, EPA noted the standards are needed “to protect Florida waters from the impacts of nitrogen and phosphorous pollution.”
 

Given the federal action, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is considering whether it would be prudent to continue its own rulemaking efforts on the issue. In a statement, DEP Secretary Michael Sole, noted: “Over the last 10 years, Florida has invested thousands of staff hours in development of numeric nutrient criteria, and throughout the last year we have moved aggressively to analyze the massive amount of nutrient and biological data available for Florida waters. Alone, Florida accounts for 30% of the national water quality dataset far surpassing any other state in the nation. Our efforts have focused on appropriately addressing the complexity of Florida’s ecosystems and coinciding with the intent, schedule and guidance provided from EPA.

“Florida has made a tremendous investment to collect and analyze the data necessary to define how nutrient enrichment affects the biological health of our surface waters. To ensure that there is no duplication of work, we will continue to work with EPA in the same manner they have worked with us as they develop the criteria. We look forward to EPA presenting its criteria to both DEP and the stakeholders of Florida.”

 

EPA has until Jan. 14, 2010 to set the new limits for Florida’s creeks, rivers, and lakes. The rules must be finalized by October 2010.
 

Leave a Reply

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

As an engineer, I have spent many years working on reducing and preventing fertilizer from leaving the fields here in south Florida. The Florida farmer has made great strides in preventing nutrients from leaving the fields, which data collect by DEP was showing. Now, EPA in paying aback Obama’s radical backers, is throwing it all away because of individuals radical notions of what is happening. The only thing groups like Sierra Club, FWF and SFWMD is making it impossible for the farmer to make a living. This will bring more development, which increase runoff. DEP’s data showed that some the of the worse water quality was in areas where there was 1/2 acre to 10 acre lots. That stands to reason, sense those individuals tend not to farm for a living and typically don’t have the basic understanding of plant nutrient or how nutrient travel within an eco-system.

This is truly a sad day for Florida agriculture.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Alger Farms cooperated with U of Florida Extension some years back in determining whether we could use less fertilizer growing our sweet corn in South Dade County. What we proved was less fertilizer would impact both quality and quantity. Given this, we could not justify continuing farming with bureaucrats telling us how much fertilizer to apply.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Here is a radical thought, instead or sticking this all on the backs of the Florida Farmers why doesn’t the EPA go after the golf course industry and the home landscaping industries??? Oh, I remember why because the people that are the Sierra Club would have horrible looking lawns and no where to golf!! I sure hope that the geniuses that are running this country wake up and smell the fact that we as a country are already dependant upon foreign oil, what will happen when we put all of the farms out of business and we have to rely on foregin sources for our food supplies…I suppose that our government will send people to inspect all the farms in other countries growing our food supply and cite them any time that they are out of compliance. HA!

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

It will serve no good purpose for finger pointing between golf courses, homeowners and farmers on the nitrogen runoff problem. In norteast Florida and in the Tampa area we have a number of lawn service companies who have reduced the allowable amount of nitrogen from four pounds per 1,000 sq ft to 2 lbs and still maimtain a healthy , green lawnby using Inoculaid.
In 2008 over 300 golf courses in Florida began using Inoculad to reduce their use of chemical fertilzers and chemical and irrigation demand.
On the farm usage of Inoculaid has resulted in record crop yields while reducing nitrogen usage. Put science to work for you.
By the way the one group of people who have not used this approach has been ? You guessed the city, county and state governments.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

As an engineer, I have spent many years working on reducing and preventing fertilizer from leaving the fields here in south Florida. The Florida farmer has made great strides in preventing nutrients from leaving the fields, which data collect by DEP was showing. Now, EPA in paying aback Obama’s radical backers, is throwing it all away because of individuals radical notions of what is happening. The only thing groups like Sierra Club, FWF and SFWMD is making it impossible for the farmer to make a living. This will bring more development, which increase runoff. DEP’s data showed that some the of the worse water quality was in areas where there was 1/2 acre to 10 acre lots. That stands to reason, sense those individuals tend not to farm for a living and typically don’t have the basic understanding of plant nutrient or how nutrient travel within an eco-system.

This is truly a sad day for Florida agriculture.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Alger Farms cooperated with U of Florida Extension some years back in determining whether we could use less fertilizer growing our sweet corn in South Dade County. What we proved was less fertilizer would impact both quality and quantity. Given this, we could not justify continuing farming with bureaucrats telling us how much fertilizer to apply.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Here is a radical thought, instead or sticking this all on the backs of the Florida Farmers why doesn’t the EPA go after the golf course industry and the home landscaping industries??? Oh, I remember why because the people that are the Sierra Club would have horrible looking lawns and no where to golf!! I sure hope that the geniuses that are running this country wake up and smell the fact that we as a country are already dependant upon foreign oil, what will happen when we put all of the farms out of business and we have to rely on foregin sources for our food supplies…I suppose that our government will send people to inspect all the farms in other countries growing our food supply and cite them any time that they are out of compliance. HA!

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

It will serve no good purpose for finger pointing between golf courses, homeowners and farmers on the nitrogen runoff problem. In norteast Florida and in the Tampa area we have a number of lawn service companies who have reduced the allowable amount of nitrogen from four pounds per 1,000 sq ft to 2 lbs and still maimtain a healthy , green lawnby using Inoculaid.
In 2008 over 300 golf courses in Florida began using Inoculad to reduce their use of chemical fertilzers and chemical and irrigation demand.
On the farm usage of Inoculaid has resulted in record crop yields while reducing nitrogen usage. Put science to work for you.
By the way the one group of people who have not used this approach has been ? You guessed the city, county and state governments.