Melon Harvest Shut Down Over Heat Rules

California inspectors shut down a Bakersfield watermelon harvesting operation over alleged violations of heat safety regulations, reports Bakersfield.com.

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Officials from the multi-agency enforcement team reported 17 employees of Uri Brothers Farm Inc. were working in temperatures above 90 degrees with no access to shade and no cups for water. The company is based in Bakersfield, Calif.

A company spokesman told Bakersfield.com, “I guess most of those things may be true, but not all of them.”

While an investigation could take up to six months, and could lead to fines, the watermelon operation could resume soon if the company meets state requirements, said a spokeswoman with the state Department of Industrial Relations.

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Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Baseball is played from sand lot to professional under these conditions. And small boat fishing is enjoyed by many under even worse conditions.

Where is our common sense?

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

confirming my intent to post the previously submitted comments

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I am assuming that the workers are not US but migrants (hopefully legal). They are probably from the south where the temps are normally in the 90s. This being said it is still necessary to have water and shade handy. I’ve been in the desert and know how that sun can feel. I’ve seen men dig ditch fully clothed in 110+ degree weather. There was still water and shade around. I find it hard to believe this large farmer did not have these things for their workers. Hope it doesn’t cost too much for the farmer. Common sense says you should have these things nearby.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Baseball is played from sand lot to professional under these conditions. And small boat fishing is enjoyed by many under even worse conditions.

Where is our common sense?

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

confirming my intent to post the previously submitted comments

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I am assuming that the workers are not US but migrants (hopefully legal). They are probably from the south where the temps are normally in the 90s. This being said it is still necessary to have water and shade handy. I’ve been in the desert and know how that sun can feel. I’ve seen men dig ditch fully clothed in 110+ degree weather. There was still water and shade around. I find it hard to believe this large farmer did not have these things for their workers. Hope it doesn’t cost too much for the farmer. Common sense says you should have these things nearby.