California Deemed Drought Disaster

The USDA designated much of California a drought disaster area this week, clearing the way for growers to seek emergency loans. The USDA designated 21 counties in the state as primary natural disaster areas because of losses caused by drought that officially occurred from Jan. 1, 2009, and is continuing.

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Those counties are: Alameda, Marin, San Joaquin, Colusa, Mariposa, San Luis Obispo, Contra Costa, Mendocino, Santa Clara, Inyo, Merced, Sonoma, Kern, Mono, Stanislaus, Kings, Riverside, Sutter, Lake, San Benito, and Tehama.

"President Obama and I understand these conditions caused severe damage to the area and serious harm to farms in California and we want to help," said USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack in a press release.

Farm operators in the following counties in California also qualify for natural disaster benefits because their counties are contiguous. Those counties are: Alpine, Monterey, Santa Cruz, Amador, Napa, Shasta, Butte, Orange, Solano, Calaveras, Placer, Trinity, Fresno, Plumas, Tulare, Glenn, Sacramento, Tuolumne, Humboldt, San Bernardino,Ventura, Imperial, San Diego, Yolo, Los Angeles, San Mateo, Yuba, Madera, and Santa Barbara.

Qualified farm operators in the designated areas are eligible for low interest emergency (EM) loans from USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA), provided eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. FSA has a variety of programs, in addition to the EM loan program, to help eligible farmers recover from adversity.

USDA has also made other programs available to assist farmers and ranchers, including the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Program (SURE), which was approved as part of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008; the Emergency Conservation Program; Federal Crop Insurance; and the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local USDA Service Centers for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs. Additional information is also available online at: http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov.

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Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Hey that’s great. Give them loans instead of just turning on the water. That way, they’ll be even deeper in the hole and will be more dependent on Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam…He’s your uncle, not your dad!

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

How about someone , perhaps Arnold, organizing a proper pipeline to move excess water from North Dakota and Texas and Mississippi during floods , to California. If ex VP Gore can get multi hundreds of millions for an electric car company to be sold in Finland for over $50,000 per unit , perhaps some of the largesse can be used to solve, on a permanent basis, some of the water needs of this continent.

Where are the Statesmen in this time of need. California Farm Bureau can show its metal and get something done in emergency situations like this. Let’s get with it.

I am a geologist resident in eastern Imperial County, not in the farming business but surrounded by irrigated Colorado River floodplain lands. It is painful to see a complete lack of overview on a national basis to problems such as outline in this article.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Great!! Let’s borrow more money, drill more wells and overdraft the water basin even more! These naive politicians and environmentalists have forgotten why the water projects were put into place. You cannot sustain irrigated agriculture on the scale of our California industry without the good quality water from the snowmelt. We will go the route of all agrarian societies in a matter of time when our soil becomes so salienated that it can not produce any more. Wake up! We are becoming a third world ag producer in very short order.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Certain strains of bacteria have the ability to provide and manage water. The bacteria in Quantum Growth can combine oxygen and hydrogen to produce water up to 0.74 grams of water per gram of substrate. They also have the ability to store water at an estimated rate of 200,000 gallons per hectare of soil. The bacteria can move water up and or sideways in order to support a host plant. Without the presence of an adequate population of microorganisms water will follow gravity and more below the plant’s root system. Tests on golf courses and lawns show that irrigation demand can be reduced by 30% while maintaining healthy turf. View the web site http://www.douglasspeed.com for additional information.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Hey that’s great. Give them loans instead of just turning on the water. That way, they’ll be even deeper in the hole and will be more dependent on Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam…He’s your uncle, not your dad!

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

How about someone , perhaps Arnold, organizing a proper pipeline to move excess water from North Dakota and Texas and Mississippi during floods , to California. If ex VP Gore can get multi hundreds of millions for an electric car company to be sold in Finland for over $50,000 per unit , perhaps some of the largesse can be used to solve, on a permanent basis, some of the water needs of this continent.

Where are the Statesmen in this time of need. California Farm Bureau can show its metal and get something done in emergency situations like this. Let’s get with it.

I am a geologist resident in eastern Imperial County, not in the farming business but surrounded by irrigated Colorado River floodplain lands. It is painful to see a complete lack of overview on a national basis to problems such as outline in this article.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Great!! Let’s borrow more money, drill more wells and overdraft the water basin even more! These naive politicians and environmentalists have forgotten why the water projects were put into place. You cannot sustain irrigated agriculture on the scale of our California industry without the good quality water from the snowmelt. We will go the route of all agrarian societies in a matter of time when our soil becomes so salienated that it can not produce any more. Wake up! We are becoming a third world ag producer in very short order.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Certain strains of bacteria have the ability to provide and manage water. The bacteria in Quantum Growth can combine oxygen and hydrogen to produce water up to 0.74 grams of water per gram of substrate. They also have the ability to store water at an estimated rate of 200,000 gallons per hectare of soil. The bacteria can move water up and or sideways in order to support a host plant. Without the presence of an adequate population of microorganisms water will follow gravity and more below the plant’s root system. Tests on golf courses and lawns show that irrigation demand can be reduced by 30% while maintaining healthy turf. View the web site http://www.douglasspeed.com for additional information.