USDA Releases 2010 Honey Bee CCD Progress Report

The USDA has released the 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) Progress Report highlighting current research on this still mysterious disease affecting the nation’s honey bees.

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The report, which was mandated by Congress in 2008, summarizes research by federal agencies, state departments of agriculture, universities, and private organizations to find the cause of CCD and how to stop or mitigate its impact. The report was produced by USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

“Honey bees are critical to U.S. agriculture, with about 130 crops depending on pollination to add more than $15 billion in crop value annually. It is vital that we find a way to deal with CCD,” said ARS Administrator Edward B. Knipling. “This report is an important measure of what we are learning about this serious problem.”

CCD, a syndrome characterized by the sudden disappearance of all adult honey bees in a colony, was first recognized in 2006. Since then, surveys of beekeepers indicate that the industry is suffering losses of more than 30% annually. Before the appearance of CCD, losses averaged 15% to 20% annually from a variety of factors such as varroa mites and other pests and pathogens.

During the past three years, numerous causes for CCD have been proposed and investigated. Although the cause or causes of CCD are still unknown, research summarized in the report supports the hypothesis that CCD may be a syndrome caused by many different factors, that work individually or in combination. The sequence and combination may not even be the same in every case, explained Kevin Hackett, ARS national program leader for pollination and co-chair of the USDA CCD Steering Committee.

The 2010 CCD Progress Report is available online at: www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/ccdprogressreport2010.pdf. More information about CCD can be found at: www.ars.usda.gov/CCD.

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Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

43 pages to say they don’t know, but they’re still workin’ on it. The interim report is a typical government waste of taxpayers $, albeit on a worthy project.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Bah Humbug Mr. Allen! There is much Government waste that should be addressed, but this effort isn’t on that naughty list. This is a very complex biological problem. If it were easy, it would have already been solved. It is very important to know what you don’t know, and also to detail the plethora of probable contributing factors and organize efforts to track them down. Cross-discipline disease complexes like this are very difficult because by definition, research scientists are very specialized and the causes and effects of a problem such as this are not. It’s tough to crack the code on something like that.

My one critique is that this effort appears greatly over-weighted to Regulatory and University types and greatly under-weighted to Industry. Having actual beekeepers, farmers that rely on the bees, and biotechnology innovation experts engaged in this effort at a high level would greatly enhance the capability of the team and shorten the length of time to finding a solution. Regulators and Academia are loathe to engage in such interaction and discourse with the unwashed in a meaningful way, but it truly does make the effort much stronger when it is done! I have experience with that, give me a call.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

43 pages to say they don’t know, but they’re still workin’ on it. The interim report is a typical government waste of taxpayers $, albeit on a worthy project.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Bah Humbug Mr. Allen! There is much Government waste that should be addressed, but this effort isn’t on that naughty list. This is a very complex biological problem. If it were easy, it would have already been solved. It is very important to know what you don’t know, and also to detail the plethora of probable contributing factors and organize efforts to track them down. Cross-discipline disease complexes like this are very difficult because by definition, research scientists are very specialized and the causes and effects of a problem such as this are not. It’s tough to crack the code on something like that.

My one critique is that this effort appears greatly over-weighted to Regulatory and University types and greatly under-weighted to Industry. Having actual beekeepers, farmers that rely on the bees, and biotechnology innovation experts engaged in this effort at a high level would greatly enhance the capability of the team and shorten the length of time to finding a solution. Regulators and Academia are loathe to engage in such interaction and discourse with the unwashed in a meaningful way, but it truly does make the effort much stronger when it is done! I have experience with that, give me a call.