$19 Million Awarded In Organic Research, Education, And Extension Grants

Agriculture Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan announced last week that more than $19 million in grants have been awarded to universities across the country to solve organic agriculture issues through the integration of research, education, and extension projects.

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“Organic agriculture is one of the fastest growing segments of U.S. agriculture and USDA and Congress, through the 2008 Farm Bill, are committed to helping this industry succeed by addressing critical organic agriculture issues through the integration of research, education and extension projects,” Merrigan said. “These grants are an important part of USDA’s new ‘Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food’ initiative, which will help develop local and regional food systems and spur economic opportunity by assisting organic producers with new production and marketing practices to meet rising consumer demand.”

Launched in September 2009, the ‘Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food’ initiative emphasizes the need for a fundamental and critical reconnection between producers and consumers. ‘Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food’ includes such major agricultural topics as supporting local farmers and community food groups; strengthening rural communities; enhancing direct marketing and farmers’ promotion programs; promoting healthy eating; protecting natural resources; and helping schools connect with locally grown foods.

More information about USDA’s National Organic Program is available online at www.ams.usda.gov/nop. Additional information about USDA’s ‘Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food’ initiative is available at, www.usda.gov/knowyourfarmer.

Fiscal Year 2009 Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative grants were awarded to:

University of California, Davis, CA, $372,135

University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam, $41, 616

University of Hawaii, Manoa, HI, $47,500

University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, $351,028

Iowa State University, Ames, IA, $1,047,024

University of Maine, Orono, ME, $1,320,378

Sustainable Agricultural Systems Lab, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, $759,480

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, $38, 466

Michigan State University, Lansing, MI, $1,049,674

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, $69,806

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, $1,419,710

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, $894,069

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, $1,431,591

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC $1,174,942

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, $470,696

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, $1,089,190

Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, $522,108

Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, $ 317,182

The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, $538,415

Utah State University, Logan, UT, $637,519

University of Vermont and State Agriculture College, Burlington, VT, $946,675

Organic Seed Alliance, Port Townsend, WA, $46,281

Washington State University, Pullman, WA, $46,794

Washington State University, Pullman, WA, $410,077

Washington State University, Pullman, WA, $1,040,210

University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, $541,172

University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, $547,621

Fiscal Year 2009 Integrated Organic and Water Quality grants were awarded to:

Iowa State University, Ames, IA, $599,027

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, $658,769

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, $659,527
 

Leave a Reply

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I guess these must some GOOD OLD BOY GRANTS because some States received two and three Grants and others ZIP !?$

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I highly doubt it has anything to do with playing favorites. It’s possible the states that didn’t get grants didn’t submit an application (perhaps there are no researchers involved in organic research) or because the grants weren’t that well written.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Why the promotion of organic over conventional? –In this Al Gore “carbon neutral” society they need to acknowledge the reality of organic needing potentially more carbon inputs than conventional or sustainably grown agriculture.–Whatever the glamour trend of the moment is that is what our leaders in D.C. want to spend our tax dollars on.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Yes, organic growing may require more carbon inputs but the carbon outputs that cause the environmental problems are less. Ever hear of “carbon sequestering”?
In reviewing the list of grant recepients it appears that the money went where it should go: to the institutions that already have signifcant on-going organic research and the staff with the knowledge for completing the grant process in a timely manner. The research at these institutions is driven by the needs of the constituents they serve and not financed by the monster chemical and seed companies.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I agree with James. Is conventional or IPM not worthy of its role in supplying the nation with abundant-wholesome Food at a very “reasonable” Price!! I think “Buy Local To Support Your Food Supply For The Future” would have been better for EVERYONE to “reconnect Producers with Consumers !

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I agree with Robert and James. God gave us the gift of science and chemistry and we have been successful in combating many diseases and insects that plague our crops. Remember Late Blight last year? Besides this whole “Global Warming” thing is a load of BS. Sustainable farming utilizing IPM is the best way to go.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Sounds like SOUR GRAPES to me. $19 million for organics? This would fund about 5 minutes of the huge agribusiness/land grant university genetic engineering research push….

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I guess these must some GOOD OLD BOY GRANTS because some States received two and three Grants and others ZIP !?$

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I highly doubt it has anything to do with playing favorites. It’s possible the states that didn’t get grants didn’t submit an application (perhaps there are no researchers involved in organic research) or because the grants weren’t that well written.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Why the promotion of organic over conventional? –In this Al Gore “carbon neutral” society they need to acknowledge the reality of organic needing potentially more carbon inputs than conventional or sustainably grown agriculture.–Whatever the glamour trend of the moment is that is what our leaders in D.C. want to spend our tax dollars on.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Yes, organic growing may require more carbon inputs but the carbon outputs that cause the environmental problems are less. Ever hear of “carbon sequestering”?
In reviewing the list of grant recepients it appears that the money went where it should go: to the institutions that already have signifcant on-going organic research and the staff with the knowledge for completing the grant process in a timely manner. The research at these institutions is driven by the needs of the constituents they serve and not financed by the monster chemical and seed companies.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I agree with James. Is conventional or IPM not worthy of its role in supplying the nation with abundant-wholesome Food at a very “reasonable” Price!! I think “Buy Local To Support Your Food Supply For The Future” would have been better for EVERYONE to “reconnect Producers with Consumers !

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

I agree with Robert and James. God gave us the gift of science and chemistry and we have been successful in combating many diseases and insects that plague our crops. Remember Late Blight last year? Besides this whole “Global Warming” thing is a load of BS. Sustainable farming utilizing IPM is the best way to go.

Avatar for Anonymous Anonymous says:

Sounds like SOUR GRAPES to me. $19 million for organics? This would fund about 5 minutes of the huge agribusiness/land grant university genetic engineering research push….